2Pac tagged posts

Feature Friday: Uptown Crown- Prime City

October 5, 2012 Feature FridayPhilly Support Philly  No comments


Feature Friday is among us again folks! I get so excited when it's time for me to post these. I was asked by someone why I do the Feature Friday each week. The answer is simple. There are a lot of positive and creative things going on in Philly, and the talent is remarkable. We're always hearing about the shootings, killings, rapings, police brutality and injustices that occur in what is supposed to be the City of Brotherly Love. It's on the news, it's in the paper, it's on the internet and radio. I would like to shine the light on people who aren't letting the negativity over-rule our city and they continue to strive for better. I also do this because it's fun for me and my own personal way of making up for ignoring my calling for being a journalist.
This week, I have the pleasure of featuring Prime City, who in my opinion is a lyrical genius. I watch most of my twitter followers from a distance. But I pay close attention to those who I can tell have straight up talent and I can honestly say Prime City has some raw, lyrical talent. I'm not as heavy into hip-hop as I was when I was a teenager. I feel as though Hip-Hop has turned disastrous and has been flooded with garbage mascarading as good music. The sampling of beats mixed with the jibberish played on the radio in my opinion is NOT Hip-Hop. But when I first started listening to Prime City's songs I said "Hey, I think we have something here." I'm not B.S'ing when I tell you that I literally was in my house HOLLERING as I listened to "DC 2 Intro" and watched the video on Youtube. If someone were to ask "What is Hip-Hop missing?", my honest answer would be: "Prime City. So if y'all asses are sleeping on him, wake the hell up, do your ears a favor and let his music flow through your speakers." His talent is undeniable and it is clearly shown on his latest CD release "King of Pressure" which you can find in Black in Noble on Broad & Erie (Cop up!!!). One of my favorite tracks on there is "My Moment" as I feel as though he touched on a lot of things that some people (not just rappers) just don't have the heart to speak on and I truly dig that. He is apart of the fast growing, popular Entertainment group- Elite Klass along with Kotta Man, (who I am trying to track down so I can feature him as well so if you read this, get with me ASAP. Don't make me shout you out by your government LOL) Bryant Jennings, who was my Friday Feature two weeks back, Relly Rostein and a few others.


I had the pleasure of speaking with Prime City yesterday and he was kind enough to allow me to do a Q&A with him. To listen to our conversation fully, you can either click here, or check it out in the widget on the right side of this blog entry. This was one of the most interesting conversations I've had in a while when it comes to Hip-Hop and I may have to snatch him up again for what I believe may be an interesting debate on what Tupac's views on Barack Obama would be if he were still alive.


Yani: I want to thank UpTown Crown for allowing me to feature him on my blog Philly Support Philly

Prime City: I want to thank you for having me and for reaching out.

Yani: Your stage name "Uptown Crown Prime City" is interesting. Where did the name come from

Prime City: Prime City comes from when I was in high school it was "Prime Time" then I just got a little too old to be called Prime Time so I just changed it up to Prime City. Uptown Crown is a series of mix tapes...my 1st CD is called "Uptown Crown" too which is a continuation of a mixtape so the mixtape was an advertisement for the album...so I figure why not promo the CD name on my twitter name instead of my regular name so that's how that came out

Yani: What inspired you to become a rapper

Prime City: Just everything around me. I just became a rapper from writing down stuff that was going on around me. Ramsquad was one of my biggest influences. One of my early influences were Tribe and Wu...I just wanted to be that voice for people who don't have it so yeah that's the reason.

Yani: How would you describe your rapping style

Prime City: Aggressive but not street aggressive...a lot of times the most aggressive people have the least to say. I've got the street edge but kinda more complex lyrics than, you know, the typical street rapper...I would describe my style as like a '98 street rapper with a rare flare of consciousness

Yani: What do you think of the latest rappers in the industry and how do you feel hip-hop has changed in the last decade

Prime City: From 2002 'til now...it used to be that you couldn't steal somebody's style, you can't steal somebody's swag, you can't take that and run with it. Now it's just like all you have to do is copy somebody else. I would say that originality is at an all time low right now. Even people who say they are original are not original. I don't see too many individuals in hip-hop from then to now. In 2002 we had Blue Print 2, the beef with Jay-Z and Nas was just getting over...that's the biggest thing for me, it's way less originality now than from 10 years ago

Yani: Tell me a little bit about your new CD King of Pressure. Which tracks are your favorite

Prime City: Wow, my favorite tracks on King of Pressure...definitely "My Moment" free style... "uptown finest"...that kinda described my style context...I was going in on it and definitely the Meek Mill intro I wanted to get a street one...it's like 30 hip-hop street sites where I can get a lot of numbers so that was cool. Those were my favorite 3

Yani: On your Instagram, I noticed you post a lot of pictures of people who purchased your CD. Where would you say most of your support has come from with your release of King of Pressure

Prime City: It's been all throughout Philly but I gotta say my neighborhood is backing me 100%  25th Street 25th and Master, Blumberg Projects they all support me 100%. Shout out to 58th street too.

Yani: If you could collaborate with anyone in the industry at this time, who would it be

Prime City: I honestly never thought of this question but it would have to be Pusha T. Even though I'm not as big of a drug dealer on a track as Pusha T, Our styles...our voices...he's probably the most similar to me. If I had a track with him on my album, it would definitely be my favorite one. I haven't even heard it yet but it's dope in my head.

Yani: How has hip-hop impacted your life

Prime City: It's kept me from doing a lot of dumb stuff. I knda always knew this is what I wanted to do. Just having a goal and a purpose just kept me out of stuff that my friends around me were getting into. Of course I've done stuff that everyone else has done but for the most part I just stayed in my hip-hop lane. It's definitely kept me away from the BS. That's like the most important thing...Even if someone doesn't become a hip-hop super star, they're staying out of the way. So that's what it did for me.

Yani: I listened to "Lean with it" freestyle and "DC 2 intro" & loved those 2 tracks as well as the videos. Is it easier for you to free style without a beat or do the rhymes come easier with a beat

Prime City: It depends on the setting. If I'm in the studio, then (it's) the beat but if I'm on a street corner then I don't need a beat. I don't want anything I just feed off of the raw energy. What we talked about what's missing, (from hip-hop) that element is missing. I don't think too many of these dudes can sit on a street corner and give you 40 odd bars out of no-where.

Yani: I have to ask this question because it never gets old and I personally like hearing other views on this topic. Tupac Vs Biggie, in your opinion who was better than who

Prime City: With them it's like playing with fire because you can't say too much about either one of them but you know, I'm just honest. Growing up, it was no comparison because I was more into the lyrics so there's was no comparison, Biggie was hands down better. It used to be to the point where I just didn't get it. I remember stopping a whole classroom. I used to live in L.A... it was my 11th grade year and I stopped the whole classroom by saying Tupac wasn't that dope. Even the teacher just started breaking it down. I mean, I changed the whole thing from Math to Tupac just saying Tupac wasn't that dope. So you know how it is on the West Coast but, as I got older, I just loved a lot of stuff that 'Pac stood for and that really transitioned into his music too, I'm like- he was dope all this time. My favorite is still Biggie but I definitely got love and respect for Tupac

Yani: Do you feel as though hip-hop is part of the reason for the dysfunction in this upcoming generation or is it a part of the ongoing violence and sexual promiscuity

Prime City: Maybe the mainstream hip-hop...I mean of course the hip-hop culture has a heavy influence on whatever it touches and it's all over the world. But how can I say that when...hip-hop is in the suburban neighborhoods but nobody is being killed there. They love Gucci Mane and Rick Ross just as much as they love them in the 'hood. I think it just comes down to your circumstances. People look at stuff and don't break it down like it should be...you can say it's been 300 murders but they're not looking at the cause...when somebody gets killed for something, that's an individual thing, not that it doesn't group into a big thing as a whole but...still I'm not looking at it like hip-Hop can hypnotize people into being a bad person... the biggest thing that hip-hop has is over seas and they're not having any of those problems...So no...I can't say that

Yani: How has your talent as a rapper, producer progressed since you first began

Prime City: I've just been getting progressively better...knowing that I don't know everything is probably what makes me what I am. I never ever settled for anything so if I'm in the studio and I hear something...say I use a new plugin that I just got off of the internet as Im engineering a track, I'll go back and make all of my other ones like that...just improving everyday and then looking back saying "I'm way better than last year." It's just a day by day, (process) getting better each day

Yani: What advice would you give to a younger male hoping to get his foot in the door to hip-hop

Prime City: Know somebody. I don't like selling that "work hard" dream to people. Like "work hard and you'll get there". Yeah, work hard because it's hard work involved. But you've got to network. I remember I was looking at this thing and it was about money...the guy on there, it was like this brainwashing thing about how you can get it but he said something that makes sense. He said "where does your paycheck come from?" your paycheck comes from a person and their paycheck comes from a person so network. Get out there and know somebody...it's hard work but you gotta get out and mess with the people. Around the time I had the CD coming out, I had to go and hit the streets and mess with the people. Get in the right circles, that positive energy and you will track the right thing.

SHOUT out to "Reek, Charles LV, Lady Lyric, n Leel Mamba from Elite Klass Sports! For more information on Prime City, you can follow him on his Twitter. Check out some of his awesome videos as well as his music on his Youtube Channel. As I mentioned, he is apart of the Entertainement venue,

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Remembering Tupac (2Pac) Shakur June 16, 1971 – September 13, 1996

September 13, 2012 Respect  No comments

I will never forget the day that Tupac was pronounced dead. It was a Friday, Friday the 13th to be exact. I was 12 years old and laying across my mother's bed with my oldest sister Sharmon, and my mother. We were playing "2500". I remember the 11 o clock news came on on Channel 6 and the "Big Story" was Tupac had passed away from gun shot wounds he suffered a week prior. I remember my heart sank into my stomach. The silence in my mother's bedroom after that announcement was deafening. Though I was not allowed to listen to a lot of his music because of the excessive use of profanity, his song "Dear Mama" & "Keep your head up" not only was one of my favorites, but my mother loved those songs, too. I remember she said, "Wow, that's the guy from the movie with Janet Jackson!" Yes, the critically acclaimed multi talented actor and rapper was gone. Who would have known the effects his death would have on hip-hop? I saw Juice when I was a really young kid but man, Tupac played the hell out of the role of "Bishop". And his role as "Lucky" in "Poetic Justice" was breath taking. You cannot deny the man had skills on the big screen when even Siskel & Ebert were giving him his props. In my honest opinion, his death along with the death of The Notorious B.I.G left a void in the hip-hop industry that has not quite been filled. Yes, Jay-Z is great. Sure, Eminem is awesome. But there was something charismatic about Tupac. He wasn't just a rapper. He had a commanding presence and had the heart to speak on some of the very problems we are still battling today.

First ship em dope let em deal to brothers
Give em guns step back watch em kill each others
It's time to fight back that's what Huey said
Two shots in the dark now Huey's Dead


Some people will argue that Tupac was an uncouth thug who only spoke of violence and degraded women. Yet some of those same people ride through the neighborhoods blasting the lyrics of new rappers who are either sampling beats & choruses from artists who came before them or incorporating lyrics from Tupac and other rappers from the 90s in their songs today. These little young thundercats may think what they're hearing is new. But it really isn't. I remember his song "You wonder why they call you B----". Pay attention to the lyrics. He's not calling all women b----es. He's speaking on women who go through great lengths to trap a man in hopes to gaining a big pay day. Women who have no standards- if the money is there, they do not care. If a zebra has stripes don't call it a cheetah. LOL! But he didn't just shine the light on those kinds of women. He paid homage to the everyday BLACK WOMAN who is the back bone and ultimate mother of our communities in "Keep Your Head Up".

And since we all came from a woman, got our name from a woman and our game from a woman,
I wonder why we take from our women, why we rape our women, do we hate our women?
I think it's time to kill for our women, time to heal our women, be real to our women
...And since a man can't make one (baby) He has no right to tell a woman
When and where to create one.
So will the real men get up?
I know you're fed up, ladies. But keep your head up...


You cannot deny that Hip-Hop would be a lot better if Tupac and Biggie had lived longer. Greatness was sure to come from both of them. So from myself as well as from every other fan who appreciates what Tupac brought to the industry poetically, through his music as well as on the big screen, Philly pays homage to one of the best to ever do it. RIP Tupac- my Gemini brother! And on that note, I'd like to leave my readers with his poem "Tomorrow"

Today is filled with anger
fueled with hidden hate
scared of being outcast
afraid of common fate
Today is built on tragedies
which no one wants 2 face
nightmares 2 humanities
and morally disgraced
Tonight is filled with rage
violence in the air
children bred with ruthlessness
because no one at home cares
Tonight I lay my head down
but the pressure never stops
gnawing at my sanity
content when I am dropped
But 2morrow I c change
a chance 2 build a new
Built on spirit intent of Heart
and ideals
based on truth
and tomorrow I wake with second wind
and strong because of pride
2 know I fought with all my heart 2 keep my
dream alive

Tupac

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