Hip-Hop Lyricist tagged posts

Feature Friday: Uptown Crown- Prime City

October 5, 2012 Feature FridayPhilly Support Philly  No comments


Feature Friday is among us again folks! I get so excited when it's time for me to post these. I was asked by someone why I do the Feature Friday each week. The answer is simple. There are a lot of positive and creative things going on in Philly, and the talent is remarkable. We're always hearing about the shootings, killings, rapings, police brutality and injustices that occur in what is supposed to be the City of Brotherly Love. It's on the news, it's in the paper, it's on the internet and radio. I would like to shine the light on people who aren't letting the negativity over-rule our city and they continue to strive for better. I also do this because it's fun for me and my own personal way of making up for ignoring my calling for being a journalist.
This week, I have the pleasure of featuring Prime City, who in my opinion is a lyrical genius. I watch most of my twitter followers from a distance. But I pay close attention to those who I can tell have straight up talent and I can honestly say Prime City has some raw, lyrical talent. I'm not as heavy into hip-hop as I was when I was a teenager. I feel as though Hip-Hop has turned disastrous and has been flooded with garbage mascarading as good music. The sampling of beats mixed with the jibberish played on the radio in my opinion is NOT Hip-Hop. But when I first started listening to Prime City's songs I said "Hey, I think we have something here." I'm not B.S'ing when I tell you that I literally was in my house HOLLERING as I listened to "DC 2 Intro" and watched the video on Youtube. If someone were to ask "What is Hip-Hop missing?", my honest answer would be: "Prime City. So if y'all asses are sleeping on him, wake the hell up, do your ears a favor and let his music flow through your speakers." His talent is undeniable and it is clearly shown on his latest CD release "King of Pressure" which you can find in Black in Noble on Broad & Erie (Cop up!!!). One of my favorite tracks on there is "My Moment" as I feel as though he touched on a lot of things that some people (not just rappers) just don't have the heart to speak on and I truly dig that. He is apart of the fast growing, popular Entertainment group- Elite Klass along with Kotta Man, (who I am trying to track down so I can feature him as well so if you read this, get with me ASAP. Don't make me shout you out by your government LOL) Bryant Jennings, who was my Friday Feature two weeks back, Relly Rostein and a few others.


I had the pleasure of speaking with Prime City yesterday and he was kind enough to allow me to do a Q&A with him. To listen to our conversation fully, you can either click here, or check it out in the widget on the right side of this blog entry. This was one of the most interesting conversations I've had in a while when it comes to Hip-Hop and I may have to snatch him up again for what I believe may be an interesting debate on what Tupac's views on Barack Obama would be if he were still alive.


Yani: I want to thank UpTown Crown for allowing me to feature him on my blog Philly Support Philly

Prime City: I want to thank you for having me and for reaching out.

Yani: Your stage name "Uptown Crown Prime City" is interesting. Where did the name come from

Prime City: Prime City comes from when I was in high school it was "Prime Time" then I just got a little too old to be called Prime Time so I just changed it up to Prime City. Uptown Crown is a series of mix tapes...my 1st CD is called "Uptown Crown" too which is a continuation of a mixtape so the mixtape was an advertisement for the album...so I figure why not promo the CD name on my twitter name instead of my regular name so that's how that came out

Yani: What inspired you to become a rapper

Prime City: Just everything around me. I just became a rapper from writing down stuff that was going on around me. Ramsquad was one of my biggest influences. One of my early influences were Tribe and Wu...I just wanted to be that voice for people who don't have it so yeah that's the reason.

Yani: How would you describe your rapping style

Prime City: Aggressive but not street aggressive...a lot of times the most aggressive people have the least to say. I've got the street edge but kinda more complex lyrics than, you know, the typical street rapper...I would describe my style as like a '98 street rapper with a rare flare of consciousness

Yani: What do you think of the latest rappers in the industry and how do you feel hip-hop has changed in the last decade

Prime City: From 2002 'til now...it used to be that you couldn't steal somebody's style, you can't steal somebody's swag, you can't take that and run with it. Now it's just like all you have to do is copy somebody else. I would say that originality is at an all time low right now. Even people who say they are original are not original. I don't see too many individuals in hip-hop from then to now. In 2002 we had Blue Print 2, the beef with Jay-Z and Nas was just getting over...that's the biggest thing for me, it's way less originality now than from 10 years ago

Yani: Tell me a little bit about your new CD King of Pressure. Which tracks are your favorite

Prime City: Wow, my favorite tracks on King of Pressure...definitely "My Moment" free style... "uptown finest"...that kinda described my style context...I was going in on it and definitely the Meek Mill intro I wanted to get a street one...it's like 30 hip-hop street sites where I can get a lot of numbers so that was cool. Those were my favorite 3

Yani: On your Instagram, I noticed you post a lot of pictures of people who purchased your CD. Where would you say most of your support has come from with your release of King of Pressure

Prime City: It's been all throughout Philly but I gotta say my neighborhood is backing me 100%  25th Street 25th and Master, Blumberg Projects they all support me 100%. Shout out to 58th street too.

Yani: If you could collaborate with anyone in the industry at this time, who would it be

Prime City: I honestly never thought of this question but it would have to be Pusha T. Even though I'm not as big of a drug dealer on a track as Pusha T, Our styles...our voices...he's probably the most similar to me. If I had a track with him on my album, it would definitely be my favorite one. I haven't even heard it yet but it's dope in my head.

Yani: How has hip-hop impacted your life

Prime City: It's kept me from doing a lot of dumb stuff. I knda always knew this is what I wanted to do. Just having a goal and a purpose just kept me out of stuff that my friends around me were getting into. Of course I've done stuff that everyone else has done but for the most part I just stayed in my hip-hop lane. It's definitely kept me away from the BS. That's like the most important thing...Even if someone doesn't become a hip-hop super star, they're staying out of the way. So that's what it did for me.

Yani: I listened to "Lean with it" freestyle and "DC 2 intro" & loved those 2 tracks as well as the videos. Is it easier for you to free style without a beat or do the rhymes come easier with a beat

Prime City: It depends on the setting. If I'm in the studio, then (it's) the beat but if I'm on a street corner then I don't need a beat. I don't want anything I just feed off of the raw energy. What we talked about what's missing, (from hip-hop) that element is missing. I don't think too many of these dudes can sit on a street corner and give you 40 odd bars out of no-where.

Yani: I have to ask this question because it never gets old and I personally like hearing other views on this topic. Tupac Vs Biggie, in your opinion who was better than who

Prime City: With them it's like playing with fire because you can't say too much about either one of them but you know, I'm just honest. Growing up, it was no comparison because I was more into the lyrics so there's was no comparison, Biggie was hands down better. It used to be to the point where I just didn't get it. I remember stopping a whole classroom. I used to live in L.A... it was my 11th grade year and I stopped the whole classroom by saying Tupac wasn't that dope. Even the teacher just started breaking it down. I mean, I changed the whole thing from Math to Tupac just saying Tupac wasn't that dope. So you know how it is on the West Coast but, as I got older, I just loved a lot of stuff that 'Pac stood for and that really transitioned into his music too, I'm like- he was dope all this time. My favorite is still Biggie but I definitely got love and respect for Tupac

Yani: Do you feel as though hip-hop is part of the reason for the dysfunction in this upcoming generation or is it a part of the ongoing violence and sexual promiscuity

Prime City: Maybe the mainstream hip-hop...I mean of course the hip-hop culture has a heavy influence on whatever it touches and it's all over the world. But how can I say that when...hip-hop is in the suburban neighborhoods but nobody is being killed there. They love Gucci Mane and Rick Ross just as much as they love them in the 'hood. I think it just comes down to your circumstances. People look at stuff and don't break it down like it should be...you can say it's been 300 murders but they're not looking at the cause...when somebody gets killed for something, that's an individual thing, not that it doesn't group into a big thing as a whole but...still I'm not looking at it like hip-Hop can hypnotize people into being a bad person... the biggest thing that hip-hop has is over seas and they're not having any of those problems...So no...I can't say that

Yani: How has your talent as a rapper, producer progressed since you first began

Prime City: I've just been getting progressively better...knowing that I don't know everything is probably what makes me what I am. I never ever settled for anything so if I'm in the studio and I hear something...say I use a new plugin that I just got off of the internet as Im engineering a track, I'll go back and make all of my other ones like that...just improving everyday and then looking back saying "I'm way better than last year." It's just a day by day, (process) getting better each day

Yani: What advice would you give to a younger male hoping to get his foot in the door to hip-hop

Prime City: Know somebody. I don't like selling that "work hard" dream to people. Like "work hard and you'll get there". Yeah, work hard because it's hard work involved. But you've got to network. I remember I was looking at this thing and it was about money...the guy on there, it was like this brainwashing thing about how you can get it but he said something that makes sense. He said "where does your paycheck come from?" your paycheck comes from a person and their paycheck comes from a person so network. Get out there and know somebody...it's hard work but you gotta get out and mess with the people. Around the time I had the CD coming out, I had to go and hit the streets and mess with the people. Get in the right circles, that positive energy and you will track the right thing.

SHOUT out to "Reek, Charles LV, Lady Lyric, n Leel Mamba from Elite Klass Sports! For more information on Prime City, you can follow him on his Twitter. Check out some of his awesome videos as well as his music on his Youtube Channel. As I mentioned, he is apart of the Entertainement venue,

Read More

Featured Friday – Radio Syheem

September 14, 2012 Feature FridayPhilly Support Philly  No comments

215UFOs

Today is Feature Friday where Philly Supports Philly shows love to an up and coming artist. This Friday's feature is "Radio Syheem" repping 33rd street HEAVY! Radio Syheem is an up and coming lyricist from the North Philly area and I had the privilege of speaking with Syheem to learn more about him. At this time, he has a mixtape out entitled "Boom Box" which is available for download. On the side panel, you can check out Radio Syheem's video for one of his latest releases "Offensive Foul", which shows the street side to this "back packer" lyricist. Syheem shows his versatile side in this banger and let's his listeners know just because he doesn't rap about the streets doesn't mean he's not from the streets. The track is definitely hotness as well as the video so by all means CHECK IT OUT!When speaking with Syheem earlier, I was able to do a little Q & A with him to give readers and future fans some insight on this up and coming artist. Yani: What inspired you to become a rapper?Syheem: I don't think 1 specific person or event inspired me to become a rapper. I grew up on the legends, Pac & Biggie and was accustomed to great music. So that made me want to do it too as I got older Yani: How would you describe your rapping style? Syheem: My style is like back packer meets the streets. (Lupe is considered a backpack rapper) I consider myself lyrical with thought provoking lyrics. I don't want to over do it with (metophors) or confuse people. I don't want to feel like I need to dummy down my lyrics to appeal to a general audience but I do want to appeal to all listeners of hip-hop Yani: What do you hope to accomplish in the hip-hop industry? Syheem: I would like to be recognized by my peers as a unique and respected artist. I also want to be recognized as a film maker. I really want to be seen as multi-talented. Although hip-hop is where my heart is, I'm hoping to advance beyond hip-hop in film making and graphic design. I want to have my hands in as many parts of this industry as possible. I just feel as though if other people can do it, why can't I? I ran into trouble trying to be listed on other websites so I developed my own. I do hope to network with others. And I won't take no for an answer. If other people won't help, I'll just help myself.Yani: How do you feel that the hip hop industry has impacted your life? Syheem: It impacted my life in a lot of ways; the way I talk, how I dress and how I carry myself. I don't think hip-hop is just music, it's a way of life. Hip-hop is all I think about when I wake up; what's my next move, my next song? Hip-Hop influenced my life all around. Yani: Who was your favorite rapper growing up? Syheem: The first song I knew the words to was "Regulators" by Warren G and Nate Dogg. Warren G was the first one to make me want to get into hip-hop. He was one of my first influences. I also liked Wu-tang and Nas. I came back to Biggie and Pac when I got older so I could understand what they were rapping about. Right now, my favorite artist is Kid Cudi. Although he isnt lyrical, I can relate to him because he seems like he was the underdog which is how I was in school. He (Cudi) isnt afraid to expose himself to his listeners. I feel as though he says things that other rappers dont have the heart to say. I thinks Kid Cudi is more realistic. Yani: For years, there has been an ongoing dispute with who is the best between Tupac and Biggie. Who do you choose and why? Syheem: I think Biggie is the better between Tupac and Biggie. I think Biggie was more visual. I feel as though Pac was "too much" (hot headed and a rebel) I can't take anything away from Pac as a rapper because he was a great artist but, Biggie's lyrics stuck with me. I think Biggie was realer in regards to his looks (fat black ugly as ever but could still get any girl he wanted). He wasn't the pretty boy. He gave guys with less confidence about their looks, more confidence when approaching a female Yani: What do you think your best song is right now? Syheem: It depends on the listener. If it's a female listener, I feel as though the best song is "Thrill is gone". That's a more emotional song that deals with family issues and is more touching. For my male listeners, I would direct them to "Offensive Foul" - A Street song. I came out with "Offensive Foul" to show that I can be a street lyricist as well as a back pack lyricist. Yani: How would you say your lyrical skill has changed since you first began rapping? Syheem: I think my skill has progressed. My 1st mix tape was released 7/6/11 and had 10 downloads. My 2nd mix tape was released 7/6/12 and has 36 downloads. So I think my flow has matured and I feel as though my writing (skill) has elevated and my experience has made me better. I don't see myelf as being a 1 dimensional rapper. I'm more so a 3D rapper. I was stuck in the 90s flow of hip-hop in my 1st mixtape, trying to bring back the feel of hip-hop from that time. But my 2nd mixtape, I focused more on appealing to todays hip-hop audience. Yani: Do you feel as though Hip-Hop is part of the reason for the dysfunction in this upcoming generation or is a part of the ongoing violence and sexual promiscuity? Syheem: I don't want to say Hip-hop is the blame, but I can understand how a weak mind can be influenced by what is seen in the videos on TV and by the music that they hear. I do believe that music can have a hold on people and can influence them in a good way or a bad way. I feel as though a person needs to be able to separate music from real life and a person should not be afraid to be their own individual and not give in to what's popular. Yani: What advice would you give to a younger male hoping to get his foot in the door to hip-hop? Syheem: I would stress that they don't quit no matter how many times they are told no. Keep pushing and go for it. Follow your gut instinct, be yourself, don't let others influence you to be something other than yourself. And most importantly Be original!!!I had an awesome chat with Syheem. Though I must disagree with his choice of Biggie over Pac (LOL) I'll let him be great on that one. Check out his music video for "Offensive Foul" and to hear 2 of his awesome tracks, "Oceans 11" and "Thrill is Gone", you can check them out in the widget on the right side of this blog. For more information on Radio Syheem, you can visit his website at www.215UFOs.wix.com You can also download his mixtape from http://www.datpiff.com/Radio-Syheem-Boombox-mixtape.370151.html and follow him on Twitter https://twitter.com/RadioSyheem. Feature Friday is brought to you via Philly Support Philly. Let's continue to look out for one another, uplift each other and keep things positive. Have a great and safe weekend folks! PEACE!!

Read More