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Fan’s Favorite Scene from “A Thug’s Redemption”

October 23, 2012 A Thug's RedemptionPhilly Support Philly  No comments

I was going through my emails when I came across this message from one of my readers. I'm not sure if I'm more moved because she said she was a fan (head rush...OMG I have fans!) or if it's because one of the scenes that made her heart race is one that still makes my heart race as well (as if I didn't write the book LOL). You know you have talent when you can look back on your work and read it as if you didn't write it.


"Hello Yani
I read your book a Thug's Redemption and it brought me back to when I was in high school- Benjamin Franklin Electron C/o '97- growing up in North Philly and hanging with my friends. It was so funny and made me think of me and my girlfriends when we were teenagers. But the part that let me know it was about to get real was the scenes when everything came out about the gun with Shawn, Jamal and Samir. My eyes were glued to the pages and I swear I held my breath when the secrets started coming out! I think you're very talented and I wish you a lot of success as a black woman and author. Your site and blog is great. Philly Support Philly!
From Aisha"


Thanks so much Aisha, it means a lot to me when I hear from my readers and I'm told how much they enjoy my work. For those who have not purchased the book yet, here are the scenes that Aisha was talking about:

Check out an Excerpt from my debut novel "A Thug's Redemption"

Shawn was sitting in his room still pondering his situation. He knew if he did the favor, he would risk losing Chanda and could possibly go to jail. He also knew that if he didn’t do it, he could go to jail for murder or Samir was destined to do something stupid. He tossed his ball in the air trying to find a reasonable solution.
Jamal came in his doorway and looked down at him. “What’s wrong?” he asked Shawn.
“Nothing,” Shawn said flatly.
“I know that look. I see through your little ass like glass nigga. You’re worried about that gun situation, aren’t you?”
“Yeah man, this is some bullshit,” Shawn replied as he tossed his ball in the air repeatedly.
“Look, it’s only for a couple weeks. Once it’s over, we go off to college and move on with our lives,” Jamal told his younger brother.
“You really think Samir is just going to let this shit be over and done with? Now the cops are trying to muscle Samir and get more out of the deal by bringing in shit for the Columbians. This shit ain’t gonna stop after one shipment and you know it. They’re not going to let us slide. They’re going to keep hanging this over our heads so they can get us to do what they want us to do for them. This shit ain’t about helping us. This shit is about helping them and getting more paper,” Shawn shook his head and threw his ball at the wall angrily.
Jamal thought about what Shawn said. He knew his younger brother was right because it was a thought that crossed his mind quite a few times since this all hit the fan. He was beginning to understand what Samir’s motives were and how he damned himself the minute he asked for help with carrying out the hit on Khalil. Samir wanted him to be his soldier, not a part-time help. He wanted Jamal sucked into the game simply because Jamal was so ruthless when it came to certain matters. Jamal was trying to humble himself and move past all of that. Unfortunately, Samir wasn’t trying to let him go.
The damage that he had done by killing Khalil was becoming clear. Family or not, Samir was never going to let him go and that murder was his leverage to control him. The only problem was, now his brother was paying for his need for revenge though he had nothing to do with the situation. Anger took over him quickly.
“You know what? Fuck this shit. I lived that street life, not you. And I’m not about to let Samir keep thinking that he can control me behind some shit that happened three years ago, trying to make it seem like I owe him because I don’t owe him shit. When I talk to him, I’ma let him know to leave you out of this. I don’t want you or nobody else to pay for what I did. I pulled the trigger, not you. And if it comes down to it, I’ll take the fall. Don’t worry about it. I got this.”
“Alright,” Shawn replied, not really knowing what else to say.
Jamal left and went straight to Samir’s house. He knocked on his door and waited patiently for an answer knowing that he was home because it was collection day.
Samir opened his door and peaked out. “What’s up, Jamal? I ain’t know you were coming by.” He opened the door wider so Jamal could come in.
“I’m not going to stay long because I have a lot of stuff to do at home. I just wanted to say that y’all need to leave Shawn out of this, for real. He didn’t have nothing to do with Khalil getting killed, that was all me. Just leave him out of this and let me do this like I always do. He’s trying to go to college, just let him chill.”
“What the fuck does that have to do with me? Now I know that your little brother is trying to do his thing with his basketball and everything. But that shit he pulled taking that gun just brought on more problems than I was trying to have to fucking deal with. I got fucking heat on me now ‘Mal! The muthafucking pigs is looking for a reason to pinch me and because of that shit I got to do business with these spick ass Columbians, bring their shit in on my turf and on top of that shit, divvy out more of a cut to keep muthafuckas quiet. Shawn doesn’t know what fucking trouble he’s causing right now behind that shit he pulled last year. So I don’t give a fuck what he’s trying to do. He can either man up on this shit or…” Samir trailed off.
“Or what?” Jamal asked, having an idea of what Samir was thinking.
“Let me just say if y’all had been any other niggas on the street, I would’ve saved myself the aggravation and killed both of y’all,” Samir said with a straight face.
Jamal looked at Samir as if he were crazy. “You’re really going to come out of your mouth and say some shit like that? We’re supposed to be family.”
“Fuck that family shit, Jamal. This is business. Everybody is expendable.”
Jamal became furious. “It’s the fuck like that? How about we do the shit like this? I’ma turn myself in and tell the cops I killed Khalil, fuck it. And when they ask how, I’m telling everything. Fuck that family shit you say? Since it’s fuck me nigga, now it’s fuck you, too.”
Samir snatched Jamal up by his neck and pushed him into the wall. They struggled with each other in a grip pushing back and forth until Samir managed to pin Jamal down on his dining room table. “You're a snitch now, nigga? Huh?! Is that what the fuck you just said, pussy? IS IT!?” He pulled a gun out and turned Jamal over so he could face him and pushed the gun into his face. “I’ll blow your muthafucking scalp off right here, nigga! After everything I did for you, you’re whipping your dick out and telling me to suck it by trying to snitch?”
Jamal looked Samir dead in the eye and said calmly. “I ain’t scared of you, Sa. You’re just another motherfucker off the street.”
Samir cocked his gun. “You ain’t scared nigga? Yeah, just like your fucking pop. That nigga was fearless, too. Ready to ride at the drop of a hat and had niggas shook around here. But unlike you, the nigga was reckless and sloppy until I shut his shit down.”
Jamal looked at Samir wide eyed making sure he understood what Samir had just said to him. He just admitted to killing his father. A man he vaguely remembered. A man that he thought had just upped and left his mother struggling to take care of him and his brother. The room swam as Jamal tried to process what Samir just said.
“That’s right. I got him the fuck out of here so what makes you think I won’t get you and Shawn the fuck out of here too? Y’all niggas ain’t shit to me,” Samir said in a low and threatening tone. Jamal trembled with anger. “Now dig this shit and dig it good, muthafucka. I cleaned up after your punk ass too many times for you to come in my face talking about some snitching shit. Talking about that shit alone is enough to body your bitch ass right now. I’ma leave Shawn out of this. But you nigga, I own your muthafucking ass like I’m your daddy, nigga. I’ma even be nice and let you wait until the end of the school year. Because the more I clean up after you, the more your bitch-ass is going to owe me.” He took the gun away from Jamal’s head and smacked Jamal on the cheek slightly as he smiled. “So we’re cool now? We have an understanding?”
Jamal looked at Samir angrily. “Yeah.”
“Good,” Samir said as he put his gun away. Jamal started walking to the door. “You know, Tamera is too gorgeous to be caught up in something like this. It would be a shame for something to happen to her. After all, danger isn’t for pretty little girls.” He looked at Jamal with a sly grin on his face when he turned to face him. “I’m just saying.”
“You better leave her the fuck out of this. You got a problem with me. Leave the shit with me.” Jamal said through clenched teeth. He swore if he was carrying he would have blown Samir away right then and there.
Samir smiled but then his expression became very serious. “You heard what the fuck I said. If you even try some slick snitching shit, I’ma kill you, Shawn and your fucking wifey.”
They stared daggers at each other for a moment and then Jamal left. He was beginning to think that he had just made matters a lot worse.
Maurice stopped off at Shawn and Jamal’s house to hang out so he didn’t have to be at home when his mother returned.
“Hi Maurice,” Ms. Keyona said when she opened the door for him. “Are you here for Jamal?”
“Yeah, how are you, Ms. Keyona?” Maurice spoke.
“I’m hanging in there. Jamal’s not here. Do you want to see Shawn instead?”
“Yeah, that’s cool,” Maurice replied.
“He’s upstairs. He hasn’t come down almost all day. I don’t know what’s wrong with that boy. I don’t know where Jamal is either. He shot outta here like a bat outta hell earlier without saying one word to me. I swear these boys think they can just come and go as they please and don’t say a word to me. They swear they can handle their problems on their own. That’s why their asses stay in so much trouble. Come on in.”
Maurice came into the house and stood in the living room. Ms. Keyona went to the stairs and called up to Shawn. “Maurice is down here to see you!” She went into the kitchen to finish cooking her dinner. “So how’s school coming along, Maurice?”
“It’s alright.” Maurice replied.
“Have you started applying to colleges yet?”
“Not yet. I’m still looking for one that has my name on it,” he told her.
Shawn came downstairs and gave Maurice a handshake. “What’s up, Mar?” he then whispered. “Is my mom in there?”
“Yeah,” Maurice replied. Shawn motioned for him to come up to his room.
“Shawn, do you know where Jamal went?” Ms. Keyona asked as she came out of the kitchen.
Shawn hesitated. “No, he just said he would be right back. He probably ran to the store or went to see Tamera real quick.” He looked at Maurice and they made a grand exit up to his bedroom. Shawn closed the door behind them once they were inside.
“What’s up with you?” Maurice asked as he sat in the chair at his desk.
Shawn leaned into the wall and told Maurice the entire story about the gun, Samir and the cops that he had on the take and the kind of trouble they were in. “Now Jamal is at Samir’s house trying to see if he can get us out of this shit.”
“Y’all stay in more shit than a little bit. I thought you just told your mom you ain’t know where Jamal was?” Maurice replied.
“If I would’ve told her he was with Samir, she would’ve started bitching and I don’t feel like hearing her shit.”
“I feel you. That’s why I left my house.” They heard the door close downstairs and listened. Jamal exchanged a few brief words with his mother and then came upstairs. He knocked on Shawn’s door and then came in.
“What’s up, Maurice?” Jamal spoke. Maurice nodded his head at him and Jamal closed the door.
“What did he say?” Shawn asked.
Jamal was quiet before he said anything. He was still trying to get over the shock of finding out that his cousin, whom he had trusted all of these years, had murdered his father. “I’ve got good news and I’ve got bad news. And I got some shit that you won’t fucking believe. What I say in this room doesn’t leave this fucking room.” He looked at Maurice and Shawn both so they could see how serious he was. “Shawn, you don’t have anything to worry about. I got this. But that nigga put a gun to my head and told me he doesn’t give a fuck if we’re family or not. He straight said he would kill me, you, -and get this- Tamera, all because I told him I would take the fall for Khalil’s murder, rather than see you go to jail for some shit you didn’t do, or have him keep thinking he can jerk me the fuck around like he’s been doing these last three years.”
Shawn’s mouth was partially open in disbelief. Maurice shook his head. “That’s some fucked up shit yo,” Maurice commented.
“Yeah, he’s on our ass now. So it’s two things we gotta do: stay outta the way and get you and Tamera the fuck outta here after graduation. Or our asses are gonna be dead before we see college.”
Shawn buried his face in his hands. “This shit ain’t cool, man.”
Jamal looked at his brother for a moment debating on whether or not he should tell Shawn that their father was murdered by Samir. He cleared his throat. “Shawn, it’s something else.”
Shawn looked up at his brother. “Does it get any worse than this?”
Jamal looked at his brother as his eyes watered. He shook his head and then blinked his tears away. “Samir killed our father…”
The silence in the room was loud and painful as Shawn and Maurice looked at Jamal in disbelief. Neither could believe the words that came out of his mouth.
“How do you know? What the fuck do you mean Samir killed our father? That nigga told you that shit!?” Shawn said loud and angrily.
“Shawn, calm down. I don’t know the details. But when he put that gun to my head, he basically told me it wouldn’t faze him if he killed us just like it didn’t faze him when he killed our dad.” Jamal shook his head.
“You can’t be fucking serious, Jamal. Y’all cousin killed your fucking dad? Does your mom know?” Maurice asked.
“That’s a good question,” Jamal replied as he thought about how much their mother hated Samir. It was beginning to become clear.
“We need to go fucking ask her then,” Shawn said as he moved towards the door.
Jamal stopped him, “No. Let me talk to her first. Something is going on with this family. It’s a bunch of secrets and shit going on that’s about to hit the fan and blow around. If Mommy knew all this time that Daddy got killed and Samir did it but she didn’t say anything…” Jamal trailed off unable to finish his thought. Too much was going on in his mind. “I’ma talk to her Shawn, alright? But you need to calm down and chill.”
Shawn was fuming but he took heed to his brother’s warning.

Later that night after Maurice went home and Shawn had gone to bed, Jamal knocked on his mother’s door.
“Yes?” she answered, sounding tired.
“Mom, I need to talk to you,” Jamal replied through the door.
“Come on in Jamal,” Ms. Keyona told him.
Jamal opened the door and came into her room. He closed the door behind him and then leaned onto her dresser. He stared at her for a long time.
“What’s wrong, honey?” Ms. Keyona asked him. She could tell that something was deeply troubling her son.
“Tell me about my father?” Jamal asked in a low flat tone.
Ms. Keyona looked him in his face and then looked away. “What do you want to know?”
“Just tell me about him. I want to know who he is. I want to know his name. Who knows, maybe one day I’ll find him,” Jamal studied her facial expressions to see how she would react.
“There’s nothing to tell. His name was Andre Williams. When Shawn was about two years old, he left and never came back.”
Jamal stared at her quietly before he said anything. “You know what? It’s a damn shame that I’m 18 years old, Shawn is 17 and you still won’t tell us the truth. You still won’t tell us the whole story about our father.”
“Watch your mouth!” Ms. Keyona replied.
“Where’s my father?” Jamal asked again.
“I don’t know,” Ms. Keyona replied.
“You don’t know?” Jamal took a couple steps towards her. “Tell me why you never liked Samir, mom?”
“I never said I don’t like Samir. I just know what he’s into and I don’t want him in my house,” Ms. Keyona answered. She was becoming nervous.
“Mom, all these years you let me and Shawn believe our father left you. You let us believe that our dad was this no good bum who walked out and didn’t give a fuck about us. But you knew all along that he was dead.” Jamal’s voice cracked as he continued to talk. “You knew Samir killed my father and you never said anything.”
Ms. Keyona looked at her son wide eyed. “Who told you that, Jamal?”
“How come you never said anything, mom?” Jamal asked. The pain could be heard in his voice.
Ms. Keyona put her hands to her face and started sobbing. “Jamal, I couldn’t say anything,” she sobbed unable to say another word.
“Mom, what happened to my father?” Jamal asked again.
Ms. Keyona wiped her face. She waited a moment before she began speaking. “Your father was out there in the streets hustling. He worked for a man named Smitty but he was like his right hand man. I never really nagged him about his business because he told me from the door that as long as I took care of home, he would take care of us. So I stayed in my place and played my part as you kids would say today. He was respected because he didn’t take any shit. Just like you, Jamal. I swear, the two of you are so much alike, it frightens me.” Ms. Keyona cleared her throat and continued.
“Samir was trying to come up in the streets under Smitty’s rival, Kristoff. Out of no-where, Smitty got locked up one night so your father started taking care of business for him. There was a rumor that someone snitched and that was how Smitty got knocked. A lot of people said Samir snitched to the cops to take the heat off of him and Kristoff. Out of no-where, Smitty was killed in his cell. Knifed in his sleep if I remember correctly. I think they figured if he was dead, that would give them the opportunity to take his territory. But your father maintained things. Samir wanted your father to work for him and Kristoff. Your father turned him down and things got heated. There was supposed to be a truce. One night, Samir came by the house. I remember I had just put Shawn to bed and you were sleep. You were about 4 and Shawn had just turned 3. I remember they were getting loud and normally I would stay upstairs when he was conducting business but I never trusted Samir and had a feeling he was going to do something dirty. I never would’ve thought that he would kill your father, I mean at the time he was only sixteen at best.
“I heard your father say something that alarmed me and I came downstairs. I saw Samir pull the gun. I screamed out something and before I knew it, he shot your father in the chest. He killed your father right in front of me. Kristoff was there too. They told me if I wanted to see both you and Shawn grow up, I’d better keep my mouth closed about what I saw.” Ms. Keyona became silent for a moment. “And so I did.”
“Your father was everything to me. And Jamal I swear you are the splitting image of that man. Seeing you in the streets like this scares the hell out of me because I don’t want the same thing that happened to your father to happen to you. I hate Samir for what he did. God knows I do. And I wish something could have been done but he has too many cops in this city at his back.”
Jamal looked at his mother with mixed emotions. A part of him was angry that she had kept that kind of secret from him and his brother. Another part of him was furious that all of this time Samir had been playing him, using him. The man he trusted and admired for so long was really a back stabbing fraud that murdered his father right in front of his mother and had her living in fear and living a lie for so long.
Jamal walked over to his mother and gave her a hug without saying anything. He kissed her on her forehead and said, “Everything will be fine, mom. Don’t worry.” He went back to his bedroom and sat down. He didn’t want to do anything rash that would cause his brother and girlfriend to be killed. But one thing was for certain and two things were for sure, Samir was going to pay for what he put his family through.

For purchasing options, visit www.anitbeetproductions.net/purchase.html Thanks for stopping by! Peace!

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My first interview: 5 minutes, 5 questions with Joey Pinkney

October 14, 2012 A Thug's Redemption  No comments


I'm so excited to have done my first interview about my novel "A Thug's Redemption" with Joey Pinkney! This entire process of producing and promoting my book has been such a fun and fulfilling journey and experience. But to see an article written about me and my work and even more rewarding! The questions that Joey asked me were great and I felt it gave people the opportunity to get to know "Yani" a little bit more, as well as inform people about my novel, A Thug's Redemption, as well as make readers aware that I am here. Here is a little sample of the interview, 5 minutes, 5 questions.

JP: What sets “A Thug’s Redemption” apart from other books in the same genre?

YA: “A Thug’s Redemption” doesn’t glorify drugs, sex and the violence that has plagued inner city Philadelphia. This is a young man who was caught up in the streets behind a poor decision that he made and he was trying hard to make amends with his past. (read more)

JP: As an author, what are the keys to your success that led to “A Thug’s Redemption” getting out to the public?

YA: I believe the keys to my success would be for me to make myself more socially available. I’m so used to being closed off and staying to myself. In order for people to know about “Yani”, I need to mix with the people more by promoting, advertising and blogging. (read more)

JP: As an author, what is your writing process? How long did it take you to start and finish “A Thug’s Redemption”?

YA: I get flashes. That may sound weird to people. I could be sitting somewhere like on a train or at work and all of a sudden, I’ll see something happen in my “creative mind”. I start writing from there. (read more)

JP: What’s next for Yani?
YA: More writing. I’m constantly writing every day. I have seven more novels in my head now that I am trying to get into print. I’m writing 2 books at the same time: “A Thug’s Redemption 2: Jamal’s Return” and “Obsessive Intimacies”. (read more)

To read the full article by Joey Pinkney, Click Here!

If you enjoy reading or if you are an author looking a little exposure, I strongly recommend Joey Pinkney. He is professional, courtesy and a delight to work with. You can also follow him on Twitter as well. I want to thank Joey for the wonderful article. And I want to thank all of my readers for their continued support throughout my journey! Thanks for reading! PEACE!!

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Feature Friday: Uptown Crown- Prime City

October 5, 2012 Feature FridayPhilly Support Philly  No comments


Feature Friday is among us again folks! I get so excited when it's time for me to post these. I was asked by someone why I do the Feature Friday each week. The answer is simple. There are a lot of positive and creative things going on in Philly, and the talent is remarkable. We're always hearing about the shootings, killings, rapings, police brutality and injustices that occur in what is supposed to be the City of Brotherly Love. It's on the news, it's in the paper, it's on the internet and radio. I would like to shine the light on people who aren't letting the negativity over-rule our city and they continue to strive for better. I also do this because it's fun for me and my own personal way of making up for ignoring my calling for being a journalist.
This week, I have the pleasure of featuring Prime City, who in my opinion is a lyrical genius. I watch most of my twitter followers from a distance. But I pay close attention to those who I can tell have straight up talent and I can honestly say Prime City has some raw, lyrical talent. I'm not as heavy into hip-hop as I was when I was a teenager. I feel as though Hip-Hop has turned disastrous and has been flooded with garbage mascarading as good music. The sampling of beats mixed with the jibberish played on the radio in my opinion is NOT Hip-Hop. But when I first started listening to Prime City's songs I said "Hey, I think we have something here." I'm not B.S'ing when I tell you that I literally was in my house HOLLERING as I listened to "DC 2 Intro" and watched the video on Youtube. If someone were to ask "What is Hip-Hop missing?", my honest answer would be: "Prime City. So if y'all asses are sleeping on him, wake the hell up, do your ears a favor and let his music flow through your speakers." His talent is undeniable and it is clearly shown on his latest CD release "King of Pressure" which you can find in Black in Noble on Broad & Erie (Cop up!!!). One of my favorite tracks on there is "My Moment" as I feel as though he touched on a lot of things that some people (not just rappers) just don't have the heart to speak on and I truly dig that. He is apart of the fast growing, popular Entertainment group- Elite Klass along with Kotta Man, (who I am trying to track down so I can feature him as well so if you read this, get with me ASAP. Don't make me shout you out by your government LOL) Bryant Jennings, who was my Friday Feature two weeks back, Relly Rostein and a few others.


I had the pleasure of speaking with Prime City yesterday and he was kind enough to allow me to do a Q&A with him. To listen to our conversation fully, you can either click here, or check it out in the widget on the right side of this blog entry. This was one of the most interesting conversations I've had in a while when it comes to Hip-Hop and I may have to snatch him up again for what I believe may be an interesting debate on what Tupac's views on Barack Obama would be if he were still alive.


Yani: I want to thank UpTown Crown for allowing me to feature him on my blog Philly Support Philly

Prime City: I want to thank you for having me and for reaching out.

Yani: Your stage name "Uptown Crown Prime City" is interesting. Where did the name come from

Prime City: Prime City comes from when I was in high school it was "Prime Time" then I just got a little too old to be called Prime Time so I just changed it up to Prime City. Uptown Crown is a series of mix tapes...my 1st CD is called "Uptown Crown" too which is a continuation of a mixtape so the mixtape was an advertisement for the album...so I figure why not promo the CD name on my twitter name instead of my regular name so that's how that came out

Yani: What inspired you to become a rapper

Prime City: Just everything around me. I just became a rapper from writing down stuff that was going on around me. Ramsquad was one of my biggest influences. One of my early influences were Tribe and Wu...I just wanted to be that voice for people who don't have it so yeah that's the reason.

Yani: How would you describe your rapping style

Prime City: Aggressive but not street aggressive...a lot of times the most aggressive people have the least to say. I've got the street edge but kinda more complex lyrics than, you know, the typical street rapper...I would describe my style as like a '98 street rapper with a rare flare of consciousness

Yani: What do you think of the latest rappers in the industry and how do you feel hip-hop has changed in the last decade

Prime City: From 2002 'til now...it used to be that you couldn't steal somebody's style, you can't steal somebody's swag, you can't take that and run with it. Now it's just like all you have to do is copy somebody else. I would say that originality is at an all time low right now. Even people who say they are original are not original. I don't see too many individuals in hip-hop from then to now. In 2002 we had Blue Print 2, the beef with Jay-Z and Nas was just getting over...that's the biggest thing for me, it's way less originality now than from 10 years ago

Yani: Tell me a little bit about your new CD King of Pressure. Which tracks are your favorite

Prime City: Wow, my favorite tracks on King of Pressure...definitely "My Moment" free style... "uptown finest"...that kinda described my style context...I was going in on it and definitely the Meek Mill intro I wanted to get a street one...it's like 30 hip-hop street sites where I can get a lot of numbers so that was cool. Those were my favorite 3

Yani: On your Instagram, I noticed you post a lot of pictures of people who purchased your CD. Where would you say most of your support has come from with your release of King of Pressure

Prime City: It's been all throughout Philly but I gotta say my neighborhood is backing me 100%  25th Street 25th and Master, Blumberg Projects they all support me 100%. Shout out to 58th street too.

Yani: If you could collaborate with anyone in the industry at this time, who would it be

Prime City: I honestly never thought of this question but it would have to be Pusha T. Even though I'm not as big of a drug dealer on a track as Pusha T, Our styles...our voices...he's probably the most similar to me. If I had a track with him on my album, it would definitely be my favorite one. I haven't even heard it yet but it's dope in my head.

Yani: How has hip-hop impacted your life

Prime City: It's kept me from doing a lot of dumb stuff. I knda always knew this is what I wanted to do. Just having a goal and a purpose just kept me out of stuff that my friends around me were getting into. Of course I've done stuff that everyone else has done but for the most part I just stayed in my hip-hop lane. It's definitely kept me away from the BS. That's like the most important thing...Even if someone doesn't become a hip-hop super star, they're staying out of the way. So that's what it did for me.

Yani: I listened to "Lean with it" freestyle and "DC 2 intro" & loved those 2 tracks as well as the videos. Is it easier for you to free style without a beat or do the rhymes come easier with a beat

Prime City: It depends on the setting. If I'm in the studio, then (it's) the beat but if I'm on a street corner then I don't need a beat. I don't want anything I just feed off of the raw energy. What we talked about what's missing, (from hip-hop) that element is missing. I don't think too many of these dudes can sit on a street corner and give you 40 odd bars out of no-where.

Yani: I have to ask this question because it never gets old and I personally like hearing other views on this topic. Tupac Vs Biggie, in your opinion who was better than who

Prime City: With them it's like playing with fire because you can't say too much about either one of them but you know, I'm just honest. Growing up, it was no comparison because I was more into the lyrics so there's was no comparison, Biggie was hands down better. It used to be to the point where I just didn't get it. I remember stopping a whole classroom. I used to live in L.A... it was my 11th grade year and I stopped the whole classroom by saying Tupac wasn't that dope. Even the teacher just started breaking it down. I mean, I changed the whole thing from Math to Tupac just saying Tupac wasn't that dope. So you know how it is on the West Coast but, as I got older, I just loved a lot of stuff that 'Pac stood for and that really transitioned into his music too, I'm like- he was dope all this time. My favorite is still Biggie but I definitely got love and respect for Tupac

Yani: Do you feel as though hip-hop is part of the reason for the dysfunction in this upcoming generation or is it a part of the ongoing violence and sexual promiscuity

Prime City: Maybe the mainstream hip-hop...I mean of course the hip-hop culture has a heavy influence on whatever it touches and it's all over the world. But how can I say that when...hip-hop is in the suburban neighborhoods but nobody is being killed there. They love Gucci Mane and Rick Ross just as much as they love them in the 'hood. I think it just comes down to your circumstances. People look at stuff and don't break it down like it should be...you can say it's been 300 murders but they're not looking at the cause...when somebody gets killed for something, that's an individual thing, not that it doesn't group into a big thing as a whole but...still I'm not looking at it like hip-Hop can hypnotize people into being a bad person... the biggest thing that hip-hop has is over seas and they're not having any of those problems...So no...I can't say that

Yani: How has your talent as a rapper, producer progressed since you first began

Prime City: I've just been getting progressively better...knowing that I don't know everything is probably what makes me what I am. I never ever settled for anything so if I'm in the studio and I hear something...say I use a new plugin that I just got off of the internet as Im engineering a track, I'll go back and make all of my other ones like that...just improving everyday and then looking back saying "I'm way better than last year." It's just a day by day, (process) getting better each day

Yani: What advice would you give to a younger male hoping to get his foot in the door to hip-hop

Prime City: Know somebody. I don't like selling that "work hard" dream to people. Like "work hard and you'll get there". Yeah, work hard because it's hard work involved. But you've got to network. I remember I was looking at this thing and it was about money...the guy on there, it was like this brainwashing thing about how you can get it but he said something that makes sense. He said "where does your paycheck come from?" your paycheck comes from a person and their paycheck comes from a person so network. Get out there and know somebody...it's hard work but you gotta get out and mess with the people. Around the time I had the CD coming out, I had to go and hit the streets and mess with the people. Get in the right circles, that positive energy and you will track the right thing.

SHOUT out to "Reek, Charles LV, Lady Lyric, n Leel Mamba from Elite Klass Sports! For more information on Prime City, you can follow him on his Twitter. Check out some of his awesome videos as well as his music on his Youtube Channel. As I mentioned, he is apart of the Entertainement venue,

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Feature Friday- Mr. & Mrs Q. For Q-Touch Photography

September 28, 2012 Feature FridayPhilly Support Philly  No comments


Feature Friday is among us again folks! I don't know about you, but I get excited every week when it's time to post this entry because so far I have featured some awesome people! This week I am pleased to feature the fabulously talented and gifted dynamic duo from Philly, Mr. and Mrs. Q of Q-Touch Photography AKA Tyisha and Lamar. This married couple and owners of their own photography venue were kind of enough to allow me to feature them on my blog, Philly Support Philly and I must say, it was a pleasure speaking with the both of them.
I have know Tyisha for 20 years. Yes 20 long years!! It's amazing how time flies! We came up together in North Philly's Blumberg Projects, went to elementary, middle & high school together and I can honestly say it is a pleasure to have known someone as humble, well rounded and kind as this young lady. I could see Tyisha being a model in middle and high school because of her striking beauty, coupled with her height and great fashion sense so seeing her engaged in a photography business is quite fitting. I had the privilege of doing a photo-shoot with Mr. & Mrs. Q in 2011 and it was an excellent experience. The two of them were very professional, they opened their home to me to do my photo-shoot, my photos were returned to me in a timely fashion and they worked well with me considering how nervous I was LOL! I wholeheartedly recommend this couple to anyone who is looking for a photographer who demonstrates great professionalism, has excellent pricing and their work speaks for itself- grade A quality!


I had the chance to speak with Mrs. Q earlier this week and was able to do a Q&A with both her and Mr. Q, who was able to join us near the end. I also was able to record our conversation with her permission. To listen to our full conversation, you can either click the link here or check it out over on the right in the widget


Yani: This is a quick Q&A with the Fabulous Mrs. Q. Can I have the name of your photography business?

Mrs. Q: It's Q-Touch Photography, Videography and Event Planning

Yani: First off I'd like to Thank Mrs. Q for taking time out of her busy schedule and allowing me to feature her on my blog Philly Support Philly For those who aren't familiar with your remarkable work, could you tell us a little bit about your photography business?

Mrs. Q: My husband and I, we started our business...it was 2 years this September and it basically wasnt planned. Event planning was something that I thought of but photography and videography was definitely not something we planned to get into it just kinda happened. How it all got started...basically I complained to Lamar about the camera that I had (laughs) I probably shouldn't say the name of the camera. But the camera that I had was giving me too many problems....when it comes to pictures, my pictures are everything. He purchased a new camera unbeknownst to me. And he said if we're going to spend all of this money on a camera we need to step it up a notch and get a camera that will perform at its best at all times...From there it just kinda took off. Again, it wasn't our intentions, it's just that we bought this camera and invested in this camera and we just said hey, we bought this camera...let's see what we can do with it. Our first test shoot was Labor Day 2010 with my family at a block party. we took the camera out, took a couple shots. Played around with them in photoshop lightroom and...Q-Touch became...

Yani: Back in the day, we had peaches and Herb, Ashford and Simpson, Ike and Tina and now we have the fabulous Mr. and Mrs. Q. What influenced the two of you to start your own photography twosome?

Mrs. Q: The demand...like once we started playing around with it and little by little we started purchasing equipment, learning what the camera can do, showing the stuff that we were doing especially what Lamar was doing like with editing, he was really going hard with it. From there the demand just started to grow and grow and grow

Yani: What kinds of events do you normally photograph?

Mrs. Q: Everything from kiddy parties to weddings block parties, proms...photo shoots, promo photos, advertising, corporate and business...graduation. A couple of months ago we did my cousin's..he graduated from Edward Waters college...The possibilities are endless for different types of photoshoots...any and everything

Yani: photography seems to have become a huge industry where more and more people are trying to get into it. How does your work differ from the many other photographers who are trying to surface?

Mrs. Q: I'm sure any other photographer would say they try to be different. We definitely want to always think outside of the box. So far we have a couple of weddings under our belt and a couple of maternity shoots under our belt. Every photoshoot and every event that we do, even though we've done plenty of those shoots, with each one we get we say lets look at the last ones we did or the last 3. We've got to come up with some stuff. We're always talking and browsing the internet to see what others are doing and we say we have to do what they're not doing. We try to keep up with the trends. We try to keep it different, fresh and think outside of the box.

Yani: Do you & Mr. Q plan to branch out into mainstream like runway, fashion, maybe even photo journalism?

Mrs Q: Yes most definitely. However far we can go with this thing, we're trying to get there. Like I said, how this came out of no where, Q-Touch came from nothing. We didn't plan it,God just dropped it on us. So yeah, we're trying to take it as far as we can.

Yani: Between working and doing photoshoots, does it ever get too busy for you two to enjoy being a married couple?

Mrs. Q: no, never because even when we're working, we're still being a married couple because we do this together, we work together, we enjoy it...so it doesn't take from us being a married couple because we do this together.

Yani: Was it hard for you to build up your clientele when the two of you first started out.

Mrs. Q: In my opinion for us, no it wasn't hard. Our first photo shoot was Labor Day 2010. I post those pictures on Facebook after Lamar played around with them in Photoshop and...my sister's husband's cousin within five minutes of posting the pictures, she IM'ed me asking if we do pictures. Just from posting the pictures from the first camera, we said yeah. Shd asked us to do her wedding and we said yeah. So for us it wasn't hard.

Yani: What are some of your most favorite types of photo shoots that you like to do?

Mr Q: I like to do the baby pictures. It's very interesting.

Yani: For those who view your photos and are interested in modeling or doing photography, what advice would you give to them?

Mr. Q: It's a very interesting business you know, it's so many different kinds of pictures that we can provide for them. If you have a business always speak about it, talk about it. Tell the photographer the types of pictures that you want.

Mrs Q: That's my big role here, doing the booking. I don't think Lamar has done any bookings. If he gets any he'll tell them let me refer you to my wife. I like to get an idea of what they want, get a feel for their personality, try to build a relationship with them so when they come to do the shoot we have an idea of what kind of person they are and the kind of pictures they want

Mr. Q: For a person that is trying to become a photographer I would say You're not going to get better unless you take pictures. You can look up a whole bunch of videos on-line or watch people do it but you have to do it yourself. You're going to make plenty of mistakes, but just keep trying and keep practicing. Eventually you will learn. The main thing is not with your camera but always the light...start looking at light and seeing how it reflects off of people...you'll get a better understanding.

Yani: When people start their own business, they have an ultimate goal that they would like to reach. What would and Mr. Q's ultimate goal be for your photography venue?

Mrs Q: We want to take this as far as we can possibly take this. I could say that we want to get into doing photography for celebrities or doing journalism. I feel like that's putting a limitation on it because we want to get to this point and when we get there that's it. ..We definitely want this to be like a family thing we do plan on having children soon and this could be something that we pass onto them. We may have some little photographers and videographers (lol)...We do want to be our own bosses and make it so this provides for our family.

Mr Q: Another thing I already feel like I've accomplished alot already. My goal was to have pictures for my family. Now that I am as far as I am now, I can provide my family with whatever pictures they want and they can be passed down to my family.

Yani: I want to thank you, Tyisha and Mr Q: Lamar for allowing me to do this Q&A and allowing me to feature you on my blog Philly Support Philly. One last question I forgot to ask, what is the name of your website for anyone who wants to book a photoshoot with you?

Mrs Q: qtouchphotography.zenfolio.com
I had an awesome time chatting with Mr. & Mrs. Q. It is great to not only have Philly Support Philly, but to have Blacks support Black owned businesses especially when they are owned by a powerful, loving and supporting MARRIED couple such as these two. Please check out their awesome work on the above mentioned website. You can find the fabulous Mrs. Q on Facebook. Enjoy the mini photo gallery in the widget over to the right of this blog entry.
This has been another Feature Friday brought to you by Anitbeet Productions and Philly Support Philly. Let’s continue to support each other, uplift one another and keep Philly in a positive light. Thanks for reading. Have a safe, productive and BLESSED weekend. PEACE!!

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My First Amazon Review for “A Thug’s Redemption”

September 25, 2012 A Thug's Redemption  No comments

A Thug's Redemption

Today is a super awesome day for me because I received my first review on Amazon.com!! I've made many sales on Kindle and sold out my first 50 copies of A Thug's Redemption within 48 hours of releasing it earlier this month. I honestly was not expecting such a turn around. I know I had supporters, but I had no idea they would have my back so heavily. I thank each and everyone of them for their support. What sucks is, those who purchased on Kindle, I cannot see who they are so that I can thank them individually. To some, it may not be a big deal, but with me, I would like to have contact with my supporters to let them know "I see you, and you are appreciated." I have had the fortune to have some of my readers send me photos of the book once they received it. And those photos I posted on my Fan Page on Facebook. Anyone who wishes to send me photos of themselves with my book, please feel free to either tag me on my Facebook page or you can email them to me at yani@anitbeetproductions.net and I will put them up promptly.When I first began selling my novel, I asked for people to leave feedback. But after talking with my dear friend "Kytten", she advised me not to do so; that it would be better if people did it on their own so that the feedback is genuine and seems real. What Candice wrote for my books' Review was genuine and overwhelmed me. I remember how the book Be More Careful snatched me from the very first page, and to be compared to that sort of attention grabbing experience is remarkable. So to Candice, I thank you!People have been asking me when will I be doing book signings. Soon very soon! Since I am self-published, I am pretty much a one woman army, sending out press releases, marketing my book to make sure it is available to as many outlets as possible; not to mention I am a full-time student and a full-time single mom. But I promise my readers and supporters that I will be having a book signing very soon. Once I have booked my first one, I will post about it on My Twitter as well as on Facebook. That's all for now folks! PEACE!!!

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Feature Friday- Boxing Sensation Bryant “By-By” Jennings

September 21, 2012 Feature FridayPhilly Support Philly  No comments


Feature Friday is among us again folks, and this week, I have the pleasure of featuring a former classmate and Heavy Weight boxing Sensation, Mr. Bryant "By-By" Jennings. As a child, if someone had told me that Bryant would be an undefeated heavy weight boxer (15-0 7KOs), I would have believed them. From what I can remember, Bryant had a tenacity as a child that was uncanny. I joked with him on how much of a bad ass he was, but his "take no sh!t" attitude coupled with his aggression, hard work and dedication, is why he has made it to the incredible position he is in at this time.
When I first heard (in 2010) that Bryant was boxing, I said to myself- "I'm not surprised". As I said previously, I could see him kicking ass on a daily basis. What's cool about it is, he's doing it on a professional basis. The moniker "By-By" is quite fitting. As shown in his last fight against Chris Koval, his opponent said "bye-bye" after only 35 seconds into the match. The 6'2 230lb boxer is definitely a force to be reckoned with. Heavy weight boxer Bryant "By-By" Jennings
The knock out champ not only is an on the rise boxing sensation, but is also a father and still holds down a 9-5, showing his ability to not only be a man of strength in the ring, but outside of the ring as well.
And no, the talent does not stop there; as Bryant also has a lyrical gift that he proudly showcased in his recent single "Picture That", which did numbers on Youtube in just a short time of being released, and is also apart of the popular entertainment venue, "EliteKlass". To view that video, you can check it out on the widget.
I had a chance to speak with Bryant earlier this week and was able to do a Q&A with him.
Yani: What made you want to get into boxing?
Bryant: Just being a competitive person. Once I started, it felt good and I couldn't turn back
Yani: Coming up, did you ever imagine or see yourself as being this growing sensation in boxing?
Bryant: Never before, but once I started boxing, I immediately accepted my dreams and set out to accomplish my goals.
Yani: How did you get the moniker "By By"?
Bryant: It came from my nickname "B-Y". After I got my first knock out, people wanted to call me "by by". "Once you get hit, you go "bye bye"
Yani: What was your first big fight like? How did you prepare for it
mentally and what was going through your mind when you first stepped into the ring?
Bryant: My first big fight was 1/21/12. I knew I was ready mentally. I was in shape, I don't drink or smoke. And it was also my break-through fight. But I felt very confident with my ability and I knew my opponent had no chance to beat me. He had nothing.
Yani: Who would you say is your biggest source of inspiration and motivation?
Bryant: Other boxers like Floyd Mayweather and Andre Ward. Jay-Z also, because he is a person who dominates and has a lot of ambition. He is consistent, has a lot of determination and is proficient. He mastered his craft. He's a perfectionist.
Yani: Your last fight against Chris Koval resulted in a knock out in only 35 seconds. Were you disappointed that it didn't last longer or was that pretty much your prediction?
Bryant: I didn't predict that it would happen that fast. He was just caught with that first combo and then I caught him again. But I was confident that I would get the knock out.
Yani: I also got a chance to hear your track "Picture That" and saw the video on Youtube. Is it safe to say that we may get to see just as much of you on stage as we do in the ring?
Bryant: Yes it's coming. That was my solo release with EliteKlass and there's more coming
Yani: If there was anything that you could change about the Boxing industry, what would it be?
Bryant: The consistency of fighting. I would like to see (boxing) go back to 15 rounds. I would also like for the industry to be more wide spread in areas like Philly and B-More. I would also like to fight more often. But I also think fighters' names blow up prematurely before they are given a chance to show what they can really do.
Yani: Did you ever see yourself here, being one of the hottest entities in Boxing, being asked for your autograph? How does that weigh on you?
Bryant: I would never deny kids an autograph but, I'm aware of people who try to bootleg and come up from other names. It's very exciting when I'm asked for an autograph. Sometimes it does get crazy and the attention becomes unbearable. But I stay focused on my goals and mastering my craft more. I stay clear of people focused on trying to live off of me and the ones who forget about the hard work I've put in. I try to keep my mind off of everything and try to remain the same person that I am.
Yani: I'm sure in your old North Philly neighborhood, there are kids who see you as their hero or someone they truly admire. For those who hope to get into boxing when they are older, what advice would you give to them?
Bryant: Don't drink, stay away from drugs, stay disciplined and focused, and you can accomplish anything.


It was great speaking with Bryant. I have some advice for his future opponents. PROTECT YOURSELF AT ALL TIMES! This man has an 84" reach and a nasty combo that is sure to make you go "By-By". LOL!
For those who haven't had a chance to see any of Bryant's fights, go to Youtube, put his name in and watch him work. For his music video "Picture That", you can also find it on Youtube, or view it in my widget over on the right side of this blog. It's definitely HOTNESS!!

Feature Friday is brought to you by Anitbeet Productions & Philly Support Philly. Let's continue to support each other, uplift one another and keep Philly in a positive light. Thanks for reading. Have a safe and productive weekend. PEACE!!

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Football Sunday in Philly- Ugly Game, Beautiful Victory

September 16, 2012 Football sundayPhilly Support Philly  No comments


Back to back Sunday Football games played by The Philadelphia Eagles were ugly. Butt Ugly! Turn-overs, fumbles, interceptions. But the end result was a beautiful victory and The Eagles now have a 2-0 record to start off the Football season. It was a grueling process in week 2 of the NFL season, but Andy Reid's team pulled it off. One of my personal favorite moments in this game against the Baltimore Ravens was seeing Brent Celek hurdle over Ed Reed! Whoever said "White Men Can't Jump" needs to check their facts because my boy has some serious hops!!
In the first half alone, the Eagles had 3 turnovers. The first, being an interception that Mike Vick threw which was completely avoidable. (Mistakes happen). But in the end, the Eagles showed they have the potential, poise, and determination to be a better team than what was expected of them last year. Though they flopped offensively, their defense is what won the game in the final minutes against the Baltimore Ravens. I'm positive if they pull together offensively, cease with the excessive turn-overs, fumbles and interceptions, The Philadelphia Eagles will be a force to be reckoned with this season.
Opinions
Upon reading comments on the Philadelphia Eagles website, I noticed that a lot of Ravens fans were ranting about how they were going to stomp all over the Eagles and crush us. They referenced their first game in this season against the Cincinnati Bengals (Ravens- 44, Bengals-13). One fan went as far as to say that the Ravens were going to beat the Eagles 30-13, while another advised an Eagles fan to "wish upon a star" if they wanted The Eagles to win. Tsk Tsk Tsk!Facts
The Philadelphia Eagles had 3 turnovers in the first half however, the Ravens only converted 7 points from those turnovers. In passing, Mike Vick had 32 attempts with 22 completions while Flacco had 42 attempts and 22 completions. (smirking) In Rushing yards, Eagles McCoy's CAR was 16 for 81 yards while Ravens Rice's CAR was 16 and had 99 yards. But in receiving, The Ravens Pitta had 8 REC with 65 yards while my man Celec had 8 REC also, but he ran all over the Ravens with 157 yards.


At the end of the game, Eagles-24, Ravens-23. Need I say more? Yeah you can say we had fumbles, Vick threw interceptions, blah blah blah. But we closed out like we were supposed to and ultimately came out with the win
As I looked through some of those comments, I couldn't help but laugh my a$$ off. Sad predictions of the Ravens running all over the Eagles and what happened? The Eagles snuck up from behind and crushed the Ravens fans of all of their ideas of grandeur and glory. Who's wishing upon a star now? 30-13 Ravens? Nah more like 24-23 Eagles. Even after 9 turn-overs Vick showed doubters the smart thing to do against the Eagles is to BEWARE! HA! And on that note, I'm out PEACE!!!

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Remembering Tupac (2Pac) Shakur June 16, 1971 – September 13, 1996

September 13, 2012 Respect  No comments

I will never forget the day that Tupac was pronounced dead. It was a Friday, Friday the 13th to be exact. I was 12 years old and laying across my mother's bed with my oldest sister Sharmon, and my mother. We were playing "2500". I remember the 11 o clock news came on on Channel 6 and the "Big Story" was Tupac had passed away from gun shot wounds he suffered a week prior. I remember my heart sank into my stomach. The silence in my mother's bedroom after that announcement was deafening. Though I was not allowed to listen to a lot of his music because of the excessive use of profanity, his song "Dear Mama" & "Keep your head up" not only was one of my favorites, but my mother loved those songs, too. I remember she said, "Wow, that's the guy from the movie with Janet Jackson!" Yes, the critically acclaimed multi talented actor and rapper was gone. Who would have known the effects his death would have on hip-hop? I saw Juice when I was a really young kid but man, Tupac played the hell out of the role of "Bishop". And his role as "Lucky" in "Poetic Justice" was breath taking. You cannot deny the man had skills on the big screen when even Siskel & Ebert were giving him his props. In my honest opinion, his death along with the death of The Notorious B.I.G left a void in the hip-hop industry that has not quite been filled. Yes, Jay-Z is great. Sure, Eminem is awesome. But there was something charismatic about Tupac. He wasn't just a rapper. He had a commanding presence and had the heart to speak on some of the very problems we are still battling today.

First ship em dope let em deal to brothers
Give em guns step back watch em kill each others
It's time to fight back that's what Huey said
Two shots in the dark now Huey's Dead


Some people will argue that Tupac was an uncouth thug who only spoke of violence and degraded women. Yet some of those same people ride through the neighborhoods blasting the lyrics of new rappers who are either sampling beats & choruses from artists who came before them or incorporating lyrics from Tupac and other rappers from the 90s in their songs today. These little young thundercats may think what they're hearing is new. But it really isn't. I remember his song "You wonder why they call you B----". Pay attention to the lyrics. He's not calling all women b----es. He's speaking on women who go through great lengths to trap a man in hopes to gaining a big pay day. Women who have no standards- if the money is there, they do not care. If a zebra has stripes don't call it a cheetah. LOL! But he didn't just shine the light on those kinds of women. He paid homage to the everyday BLACK WOMAN who is the back bone and ultimate mother of our communities in "Keep Your Head Up".

And since we all came from a woman, got our name from a woman and our game from a woman,
I wonder why we take from our women, why we rape our women, do we hate our women?
I think it's time to kill for our women, time to heal our women, be real to our women
...And since a man can't make one (baby) He has no right to tell a woman
When and where to create one.
So will the real men get up?
I know you're fed up, ladies. But keep your head up...


You cannot deny that Hip-Hop would be a lot better if Tupac and Biggie had lived longer. Greatness was sure to come from both of them. So from myself as well as from every other fan who appreciates what Tupac brought to the industry poetically, through his music as well as on the big screen, Philly pays homage to one of the best to ever do it. RIP Tupac- my Gemini brother! And on that note, I'd like to leave my readers with his poem "Tomorrow"

Today is filled with anger
fueled with hidden hate
scared of being outcast
afraid of common fate
Today is built on tragedies
which no one wants 2 face
nightmares 2 humanities
and morally disgraced
Tonight is filled with rage
violence in the air
children bred with ruthlessness
because no one at home cares
Tonight I lay my head down
but the pressure never stops
gnawing at my sanity
content when I am dropped
But 2morrow I c change
a chance 2 build a new
Built on spirit intent of Heart
and ideals
based on truth
and tomorrow I wake with second wind
and strong because of pride
2 know I fought with all my heart 2 keep my
dream alive

Tupac

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Philly Support Philly! The Movement Begins

September 12, 2012 IntroductionPhilly Support Philly  No comments

Author of A Thug's Redemption

Oh My GOD!!! After 20 grueling hours, this blog is finallly finished! The madness that I went through with part of the design, the coding, re-coding, adjusting and readjusting, widget placements and widget cuts...MANNNNNNNN!!! When I tell y'all I need a drink, I'm not bull------- you LOL! Thankfully it is for the most part complete, with just a few more touch ups needed. I'm just happy to have finally been able to launch this blog. WELCOME READERS!!! PHILLY STAND UP!!! Allow me to introduce myself. My name is Yani, and I will be the admin of this blog. In this media playground (as I like to call it), you will find all kinds of updates on what's happening in Philly, whether it's in regards to Hip-Hop and R&B, up and coming writers from Philly, fashion designers, models, actors, dancers, scholars athletes, etc! I want people to know about it. Everyday, there is something tragic on the news about Philly. I want people to understand that there are still good things happening in this city, and those Good Things should not be overshadowed by the ugly evils that occur.I told one of my Twitter followers that as I climb my way to the top, I am bringing anyone along who was willing to climb with me. That's what I intend to do through my blog. I know how strong my desire was to not only become a published writer, but to be able to SELF PUBLISH my work. To me, that is the greatest achievement I could have made outside of becoming a mother. It is something that I've wanted since I was 15 years old. At 15 years old, I aspired to be the next Nikki Giovanni. Unfortunately today, girls at that age are aspiring to be the next Nicki Minaj. (To each their own *Yani Shrug*) Anyone who told me I would not become published and I should look into doing something else got the same response from me then that my doubters get from me now: Before I let you make a lie out of me, I'll make a believer out of you. And here I am. Do you believe me now? (smiles) I know that there are others here in Philly just like me who can't think of anything else in this world except for how strongly they want to do something. How badly they want to get up on a stage and sing, how badly they want people to hear and relate to their lyrics and rhymes, or to be able to transform on a runway or movie set. I used to say to my mom and my friends when I was a teenager, "The moment that would make me feel on top of the world is to see someone at the bus stop or on a train reading my book." It may sound silly to some, but to me, that is a joyous moment that cannot be stolen by anyone.My fingers have developed a mind of their own, I'm so happy to have this blog up LOL! Let me close this entry out by saying, this blog is here for anyone from Philly who wants to showcase their work. If you are a rapper, singer, artist, athlete, graphic designer, fashion designer, model or a person in the community trying to make a difference by educating and uplifting our younger generation and want another platform to broadcast your talents, efforts, and hard work, send me an email to yani@anitbeetproductions.net. You must include: Your Name What Part of Philly you're fromEmail AddressA brief introductionIf you are sending music, just send your file(files) as an mp3 or WAV file. If you have a video, please make sure it is no more than 3 minutes and if you are sending photos, no more than 5 images please and thank you! All are welcome to particpate. And on that note, I'm out! PEACE!! :-)

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